tutorials

Blast From The Past Series….. Part One

Some of you may know, I recently did a major revamp in my house, and moved my jewelry workspace into my “bird-room”. In the process of organizing and moving everything, I ran across a lot of wire work pieces I hadn’t seen in many years, and had forgotten all about.
That revamp lasted all of a month, and I had to rearrange it all again. You see my roommates’ folks want to move down with us, so I gave them my bedroom, and moved my things into the bird-room…… not all that bad, the room is huge. In the process, I found more “antiques” :))

Most of the pieces I swore would never see the light of day again. Then I got to thinking of a lot of the new wire workers I’ve met over the years, and the comments I’ve heard. “Your work is great, I wish mine were that good.” “I just make stuff for myself, it won’t ever be good enough to show or sell.” There have been oodles of other comments, but you get the idea.

I’ve decided that maybe showing some of my older pieces, wouldn’t be such a bad thing after all. You see very few, if any, wire artists pop into existence fully skilled. I certainly didn’t. My passion for wire started over 20 years ago, and continues to grow and develop everyday. So…. from time to time, as time allows (I’m probably already in hot water that the Cuffs and Vines tutorial isn’t finished yet), I will photograph and post some pictures of my older work, in the hopes that maybe it will inspire a “newbie” wire artist with little self-confidence to keep working at their craft, and not get discouraged.
If wire is what you love, NEVER give up, no matter what. That’s advice I’m going to follow for myself as well.

These are some of the very first pieces I did – over 20 years old for some of them. I haven’t found the very first piece yet, but it’s here somewhere :)) hideous, but it’s here…… So far I’ve found more than 300 pieces – some of them I cringe when I look at them, but others not so much. There are even quite a few I plan on revisiting *grin*. Most of these I had no clue what I was doing. I’d sit at my bench many, many nights putting pliers to wire to see what I could come up with. I desperately wanted to learn wire wrapping, and since no one really taught it, I had to experiment on my own. The Labradorite pendant was what I felt was my first true “success”, though I look at it now and cringe at the tool marks.

The Amethyst Crystal on the right side is from the first wire wrapping book I bought, about 1995, “Moods in Wire” by Ed Sinclair. It’s an awesome book for beginners. Mr. Sinclair is a true Master in our field; is and always be my friend and idol :)).

I suppose I’d better get back to my tutorials – no rest the wicked……… :))

See ya soon………………..
♥wrap happy,
♥Bobbi
http://facebook.com/BobbiMaw
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“What we do for ourselves dies with us. What we do for others and the world remains and is immortal.” ~Albert Pine

I’m Starting To Feel Cursed……

This year has been really, really rough – one set back after another, after another. If it wasn’t problems with the house, it was problems with my work. After that; relationship problems, major health issues, and financial issues – okay with that one, I’m sure just about everyone feels cursed.

Then there are the day to day curses – plumbing problems, computer viruses, car problems, and squabbling kids (no my kids are not the naked 2-legged versions – your point is?)

For weeks, I have been working on and off on a killer pair of earrings – 13.6 carats of London Blue Topaz – planning out the design, picking just the right complimentary stones – Black Spinel, and beautiful shades of Blue Tourmaline , finding quiet time to work, meticulously analyzing every turn of my pliers so as not to make a mistake. I scrutinized them under a magnifying glass when they were done, and agonized over getting just the right picture of them.

This morning, I just couldn’t leave well enough alone – I just knew I could manage a better shot of them. In setting up the shot…………. I dropped one on my terrazzo floor. Yes I can hear you groaning, and there is no need for me to repeat the barrage of expletives that followed.

As luck would have it – or the curse – it landed pavilion down, and suffered the very smallest of chips on the very point of the back of the stone. Small that is, only if you’re not an up-tight, over-worked, stressed, anal retentive perfectionist. The chip is not visible from the front – or the back when wearing them – but I still see it and – and yes I’m cursed.

thanks for commiserating with me…..
♥Bobbi

“Reverend Jorgensen: Mr. Monk, if you would be so kind as to reattach it’s head. Here’s some adhesive. Some witchgrass. Some coltsfoot. Ah. Mandrake root. Smidgen more. All I need now is the doll.
Monk: Okay, one second.
Reverend Jorgensen: It doesn’t have to be perfect.
Monk: Almost done.
Reverend Jorgensen: It’s symbolic, really.
Monk: There we go.
Reverend Jorgensen: The forces of darkness are gathering.
Monk: Hold on.
Reverend Jorgensen: It doesn’t have to be perfect!
Monk: Wait a second.
Reverend Jorgensen: It doesn’t have to be perfect.
Monk: One second, almost done.
Reverend Jorgensen: Doesn’t…
Monk: Wait one second.
Natalie: Mr. Monk, please, just let him finish!
Monk: Hold on…
Reverend Jorgensen: She’s suffering, Mr. Monk. It doesn’t have to be… okay, that’s close enough” ~ Mr Monk and the Voodoo Curse

2 Hinged cages and a Locket – Tutorial

After 2 computer crashes, countless re-writes, and a heavy teaching schedule, I finally finished my newest tutorial – 2 Hinged Cages and a Locket. It grew much larger than I originally planned, with 3 FULLY ILLUSTRATED variations. I seriously considered separating out the Locket variation as a stand alone tutorial, but the “leave it in” part of my brain won the toss.

This tutorial teaches you step by step how to create a basic hinged cage, with or without beaded embellishments. This is a wonderfully versatile design to hold a favorite stone, maybe a love note, or a treasured trinket. Once it is on a chain, it is virtually impossible to come open by accident.
As a bonus this tutorial also includes 2 COMPLETE step by step variations including a crossed wire and locket style cage.
The owner of a local bead shop showed me the mechanics of the hinge close to 15 years ago. A very dear friend of mine, Master Wire Worker Ed Sinclair, created a published one in 1994. He has generously given me permission to share my versions of the basic cage and a crossed wire technique that he developed years ago.

This is an advanced level tutorial – it assumes you are familiar with basic wire techniques and improvising when needed. It is 28 pages with 67 steps and over 100 crisp, clear photographs. The file size is 2.3MB.

Don’t be intimidated by the length and number of steps – This tutorial covers 3 FULLY illustrated pieces. While this is an advanced level tutorial, intermediate wire workers with a solid foundation of basic wire wrapping skills can, with patience, complete this design.

Thank you for visiting……. Bobbi

“Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared.” ~Bhuddha