how to make wire jewelry

Doing the Happy Dance

aka "Honey I Shrunk the Bracelets"
aka “Honey I Shrunk the Bracelets”

“Congratulations! Your design has been selected for the second round of judging in Fire Mountain Gem and Beads 2012 Swarovski Elements Jewelry-Making Contest.”

What an awesome way to end the year!!! Normally a trip out to the mail box is just a depressing assortment of bills and spam – not today….. I got a letter from Fire Mountain Gems!!!Crstal Cube Hoop Earrings

As soon as I saw the return address I started a little jig in the yard – of course, I quickly stopped, so as not to frighten the neighbors lol.

I am so totally tickled *insert big cheesy grin here*

Finalist 2011 Swarovski Elements Jewelry Making Contest
Finalist 2011 Swarovski Elements Jewelry Making Contest

Last Year was awesome winning a Finalist slot in their 2011 challenge – Here’s crossing my fingers in hopes to do it again ~~~ Wish me luck 😀

Happy New Year everybody!!!

Bobbi

“The goal isn’t to live forever, the goal is to create something that will.”  ― Chuck Palahniuk

 

 

 

Treasured Hearts Charm Holder Pendant Tutorial

Some of you may know my Mother passed away in 2005. August 1st was her birthday. 

I had been wearing some of her charms just strung on a chain, and thought it time for  something better. I played around making the charm holder pendant as a way to cheer myself up a bit. A friend suggested I should show people how to make it, since I wasn’t the only one (to wear charms strung on a chain). So here it is ~ I hope you like it.

Materials needed:

7 to 12 in. (17.8 to 30.5cm) 16ga ½ hard round wire. (depending on the size of the pendant you want to make.)   2 or 3 – 6mm(or larger) jump rings.

DSC_3086 Cut and clean a 7 inch (17.8cm) piece of half hard round wire.With your round nose pliers grasp the wire 2 in. (5.1cm) from the end of the wire.
DSC_3094 Cross the wires over the pliers, and spread them just far enough apart to create a loop.
DSC_3098 Use your thumb to shape the left lobe of the heart.
DSC_3102 Continue shaping the wire, until it looks something like this.
DSC_3103 Hold on to the completed side of the heart, and use your thumb to shape the other lobe of the heart.
DSC_3105 Slide 2 or 3 jump rings onto the shorter wire. These will act as the ‘bail’ for your pendant.
DSC_3110 Use chain nose pliers to wrap the short wire around the long wire.
DSC_3119 This is how your pendant should look at this point.
DSC_3122 With your thumb, shape the long tail of wire into a curve.
DSC_3125 With round nose pliers, grasp the wire roughly 1 inch below the wrapped wire, and bring it around the jaw of the pliers to create the bottom loop.
DSC_3132 Create a hook in the end of the wire. This will be the “latch” for your charm holder.
DSC_3146 Tada 🙂 Add some hammered texture and some charms and you’re good to go.
DSC_3149 This is mine, though I think I might need to make a bigger one.

Thank you for visiting! If you’d like the full version of the Treasured Hearts Charm Holder, please visit my Etsy Shop or My-WiredImagination.com.   Instant Download available at both locations.

Don’t forget to Wrap Happy,

Bobbi

Have You Tried Craftsy Yet?

NO???? Boy are you missing out!!! Craftsy is a wonderful online venue to learn, share and create, and not just for us jewelry junkies either.

Interested in knitting?, crocheting?, felting?, sewing?, jewelry?, quilting?, paper crafts?, embroidery? Craftsy has it all!!!
And if that’s not yummy enough, they recently added Patterns to their wonderful site. They already have thousands of patterns from Independent Designers, and more are added everyday. …….. Wait there’s more 😀 – all of the patterns offered for sale, are available for immediate/instant download – talk about instant gratification!! 😀 And if you’re one of the Designer’s with your patterns on Craftsy for sale, it gets even better, because Craftsy sells for you absolutely FREE!!! No more forking over, up to 50% of your hard work and income to someone else!!!

You gotta check it out – you’ll love it as much as I do!!! All of my work is there :)) check it out….. All of my upcoming tutorials will show up there first too! 😀

  BobbiWired

 

Faux Bow Angel Wings

Many of you know I spend a good portion of my time in my local bead store.  Being the resident wire junkie, has its perks, it also has its challenges.  One of the challenges is, that I constantly get requests to create or re-create a manufactured finding. The request usually goes something like this….. “I really love blank, but it’s not blank enough. Can you make it for me bigger, bolder, smaller, in silver, in gold, fancier, simpler, blank. blank, or blank.”Angel Pendant

That’s how the Faux Bow Angel came about – they needed bigger angel wings than are commercially available. So to make a long story short… here’s how to make wire “Angel Wings”. You could really make them any size you like, but for this we’re going to make them big – for a pendant size angel.

Materials needed for wings approximately 1 1/2 by 3/4 inches – 10 to 12 inches (25.4 to 30.5cm) 18ga Artistic wire – I like the Non-Tarnish Silver – but you can use any color you like. You can also use copper, sterling, fine silver or gold filled wire, (soft is better.)

Materials for a finished Angel : 1 lg briolette – at least 10 x 20mm drilled top to bottom; 1 bead cone in proportion to the briolette; 1-10mm round bead; 1 4 inch head pin; 1 or 2 6 to 8mm crystal rondell

Tools: flush cutters; chain nose pliers; round nose pliers; extra large round nose ( approx 15mm dia. or larger)

Now if you paid attention to the title, you might recognize the “Faux Bow”  – the angels wings are loosely based on that free tutorial. If you don’t already have a copy – head over to my “Free Tutorials” page to download a copy.

 

After cutting  your piece of wire, straighten it out with your fingers and use round nose pliers to form a small coil at the center.

 

 

 

Hold the wire so the coil hole is straight up and down – not facing you. Place your extra large round nose pliers on the wire to the right of the coil, roughly 1/2 inch from the coil as shown.

 

 

 

Bring the right wire over the pliers, forming a teardrop. The wire should cross behind the coil.

 

 

 

Put the pliers on the wire to the left of the coil, again roughly 1/2 inch from the coil.   Fold the left wire over the pliers, just as you did the right wire, to form a matching teardrop.

 

Your wings should look something like these at this point.

 

 

 

 

Hold the left ‘wing’ and the wire just under it (the right wire you angled to the left) tightly so they don’t move. If you don’t have the finger strength, use a pair of wide nylon jaw pliers. If you let the wires slip on this next part, your wings will shrink and be uneven.

 

Use the wire angled to the right, to wrap tightly around the right wing one time. Leave the wire facing down.

 

 

 

Turn the wings around, so you can get a good grip on the other wing. Bring the free end of the wire towards you, around the wing, and ending in the same direction it was in to start.

 

 

I curled the ends of the wires the same as in the Faux Bow, but you could just cut them short, and tuck them in towards the Angel.

Put your Angel together by threading the headpin from the bottom in this order – briolette, bead cone, crystal rondell, wings, round bead, and another rondell for her halo.

Form a double loop at the top for a bail, and you’re all set – maybe. 🙂

Her wings are cute, but a little too simple looking for me – sooooo….

To give the wings a little more “wingly” shape – At the middle of the outside of the wing, use flat nose pliers – grip the wire, and turn it in towards the center just a bit.

 

 

 

Turn the wings around, and do the same to the other wing.
I think she is just soooo much cuter with her shapely wings.

This one is mine – I kinda like her halo slanted off to one side *grin*

 

I hope you enjoyed a quick peek at Faux Bow Angel Wings. Look for the full tutorial on the Free Tutorials page soon.

Wrap Happy,
Bobbi

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vitrail Medium Trillion ‘Marcella’ Ring

I played around with these cute 8mm vintage trillion “sew-ons” a couple of weeks ago – the photos are quick kinda crappy phone pics, but you get the idea. They make a sweet ring, even if they are a bit fiddly to work with. They are on my play list for today for another ring and maybe some earrings too 😀

Vitrail_trillion_ring_1
Vitrail_trillion_ring_2
Vitrail_trillion_ring_3

2 down, 12 to Go – Or How to Register Your Tutorials with the US Copyright Office

So today was a really cool day. I made a trip to my PO box, expecting the regular bills and various sales trash that still plague the earth – and was very pleasantly surprised to find 2 letters from the Library of Congress. You see, almost 8 months ago, I started submitting my jewelry tutorials to the US Copyright Office for registration. At first, I checked my PO at least once a week, sometimes 2 or 3 times, looking for these prized letters. Silly me thought it would only be a matter of a couple weeks, and all my registrations would be sent. Nope, sorry – it’s not quite that easy. Well the registration part is – it’s the “wait for them to be researched, registered and returned” that’s the hard part, especially when patience isn’t your strong-suit.

Now, I know what some of you are thinking – “My tutorials are copyrighted as soon as I create them”, and/or “I put a notice at the end, that says they are my copyrighted works, so I don’t have to register”. Well you’re sort of right. Yes, you have a copyright on your work, as soon as it’s created and/or published; yes your notice at the end, does emphasize that fact a bit more. But, NO, you are not fully protected. It’s still incredibly easy for some nit to come along, and try and say, “no, that’s my work”, and without a Certificate of Registration, you’re a bit hard-pressed to defend against it. Now that same nit can still whine after you get your certificate, but then it is the nit who will be hard-pressed to get anywhere. The other major point, is if you need to file suit against someone for violating your rights, you HAVE TO have that registration before you can take them to court.

No, I’m not planning on taking anyone to court, but I, like every other artist out there, needed to protect myself against the whining nits. The copyright Office takes the time they do, because they do a thorough and exhaustive search, to see if your submission is already out there, and belonging to anyone else. When they send you your certificate, they don’t do it lightly. It’s basically the US Copyright Office standing on your side, saying, “Absolutely, Yes that’s your work”! One extra perk – Your work is also submitted to the Library of Congress as a permanent record! How cool is that?

Now you’d like a little help doing the same for your own tutorials? Well, I’m not an expert, but after 14 submissions, I’m on my way – so here’s some pointers and info to help you through it.

First you need to visit http://www.copyright.gov/ . There are tons of links and tutorials to answer just about any question you could ever have on copyrights. Then click on the eCO login
, read the privacy and security notice, then click on the link for new users towards the lower left side of the page under the login space. Be as complete as possible when you fill in your personal information. it will come in very handy later when you actually start a submission (registering a claim). The submission process has a great feature called “add me” wherever applicable, that inputs all your relevant personal information for you so you are not constantly retyping info.

The biggest hurdle is deciding what type of work you are submitting. For 99% of you, that will be a “Literary Work” in the drop down menu for type. Later in the submission you will have the opportunity to input exactly what all you think is included, ie photos, text, art, instruction, etc. There is a tutorial available at every step of the process if you get hung up. You can save the submission at any point, and come back to it later – very handy. You can work on your submissions as long as you like, there are no time limits set, when you start. It’s only when you send them money, and submit the tutorial does any of it become carved in stone, so take all the time you need.

I found it very handy to fill in every submission, all the way to the payment stage, and then “save for later”. Then whenever I was ready to pay for one, I just clicked on “working cases” in my profile, did one last quick check, and clicked “add to cart”. It’s only $35.00 per submission, and you can upload a pdf (make sure it is secured), directly after payment. You can send the tutorial by snail mail, but you can’t do both. If you send your pdf file, make sure you disable your pop-up blocker for this site first.

It doesn’t take long at all to get the hang of it. You have “working cases” – claims that are started but not paid for; “open cases” – claims that are paid for and submitted, but haven’t been registered by the CO yet; and “closed cases”. Those that have been registered and you have been sent certificates for. You can review any “case” at any time from your personal page after login, and your closed cases from the “my applications” link, also on your personal page.

I hope you take the time to at visit the US copyright Office website. The information is priceless. Other valuable information on the subject can also be found at http://www.sarahfeingold.com/
Comments and questions are always welcome – I’m not a lawyer, but I’ll try to answer you as best I can. If you get really hung-up, and you truly think you need a lawyer, make sure they are fluent in “Copyright Law”, not just patents, and trademarks – different animals all together.

Thanks for listening….

♥wrap happy,
♥Bobbi

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“What we do for ourselves dies with us. What we do for others and the world remains and is immortal.” ~Albert Pine